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anotherwellkeptsecret:

Pages 10, 11 and 12 of Oh, What a Night.

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listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

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loudest-subtext-in-television:

drawthelinestoallconstellations:

This, is for Hater’s Day. HAPPY HATER DAY
(is it Hater Day or Hater’s Day?! Garrgh >.<)

"July 25 is Hater Day in commemoration of the first day Sherlockaired and seemed really gay to the oldest TJLCers. We get the day off from work and reflect on how our haters — may they stay pressed forever — give us life, and pour bottles of water on the ground in a symbolic attempt to quench their thirst. Just as the ground can absorb bottle after bottle, we are reminded that our haters — may they stay pressed forever — shall never be quenched. This brings us another year of internal peace.”
- loudest-subtext-in-television

Tagged nsfw for Sherlock hugging John’s metaphorical dick. I kept wondering why I decided to draw that as the ‘J’, then I realized it is also the elephant in the room which most don’t acknowledge =)

And, lastly, for TJLC -
You, it’s always you. TJLC, you keep me right. ♥
Also, I’d make a million origami napkins for you guys any day (except I suck at origami but let’s just look at the sentimental part of it, okay?)

Over ‘n out. 

HATER DAY YESSS, my favorite part is the elephant trunk that is GREAT! THANK YOU FOR THIS

loudest-subtext-in-television:

sussext:

ok so i think Harry being absent from the wedding is actually more important than just a throw-away “she fell off the wagon” excuse can explain. i think something has happened to her, something very bad, and in his efforts to get her back, John will be fatally wounded, 3 Garridebs style.

Honestly I expect Moriarty has done, or will do, something with her. ‘Cause he knows her from John’s blog, and my theory is that Moriarty supplied CAM with John’s pressure points: Mary, and Harry. So he knows he can use Harry as a pressure point.

kontineo:

Way fluffier than usual for me, right?  But… I am specifically Inspired, with a capital “S”.  Derhurr……

kontineo:

Way fluffier than usual for me, right?  But… I am specifically Inspired, with a capital “S”. 
Derhurr……

(via constancecream)

constancecream:

[x]
stitchlock:

"It’s addressed to both of us.”

stitchlock:

"It’s addressed to both of us.”

(via sradanvers)

people-are-fond:

I am actually, literally, one hundred percent, totally in love with mild-lunacy.  I mean, not a lit bit.  Mild-lunacy is the new Martin Freeman for me.  No kidding.

mild-lunacy:

221blueberries:

people-are-fond:

emperorirene:

whykhan:

people-are-fond:

[snipped]

Not to mention the fact that Sherlock, I’m sorry, is socially awkward as fuck. He very probably has some low form of autism anyway (and evidence suggests ACD based him off someone with autism, before the thing was diagnosed by psychology and given a name).

In addition to which, you need to consider communication styles. The UK are pretty high context, which means they do not spoon-feed, they imply, and expect their conversation partners to implicitly understand them. By comparison, a low context society uses very blunt communication, they consider room for interpretation to be obscure and confusing.

In short, what OP presents is how an American without autism would talk. Sherlock could have spoken that way because he was “so gay lol”, or because of how his mind works and how his culture works. Considering that in addition to this he’s never had an interest in men, and would not live with one if men turned him on… hmmmmmm….

So yes please, OP, get that dumb shit off my dash.

I didn’t put it on your dash.  I put it on my blog.

[snipped]

I’m pretty sure this is another instance of Tumblr culture clash; subtlety gets lost so easily when we think we know what other people are saying. But anyway, the interesting thing to me is Sherlock’s subtlety. Was it subtlety?

JOHN: You don’t have a girlfriend, then?
SHERLOCK (still looking out of the window): Girlfriend? No, not really my area.
JOHN: Mm.
(A moment passes before he realises the possible significance of this statement.) JOHN: Oh, right. D’you have a boyfriend?
(Sherlock looks round at him sharply.)
JOHN: Which is fine, by the way.
SHERLOCK: I know it’s fine. (x)
There are really three ways to look at this: a) these are two British men we’ve just met, and know little about, making indirectly-phrased small-talk; b) these are two iconic characters we know very well by now, talking
unusually directly about their feelings and outlooks on life; c) these are two characters created by Moffat and Gatiss, establishing their takes on romantic/sexual entaglements that most likely have some relevance and/or foreshadowing use for the rest of the show.

If you think they’re just these two British dudes with issues, then you may feel free to bring in references to British culture at large, psychological diagnostics in general, and heterosexual behavior in general. You may notice that ambiguity means many things in the ‘real world’, and not feel obliged to narrow down ambiguous potentials based on fictional rules, because fiction is just a reflection of how ‘real people’ act. You can’t really assume things about real people based on how they talk, although most people feel free to speculate on Sherlock’s potential psychiatric issues (which frequently involves generalization, speculation and projection) a lot more freely than on his sexuality. Further, it is a fact that ‘coming out’ is a fraught process, and one that requires some hoops to be jumped through. It is supposed to be explicit and direct, or you’re assumed straight. Asexuality easily becomes derailed in the ‘real world reading’, because it is essentially read as ‘non-queer’ by default; ambiguity is naturally weighed towards heteronormative options (note: Irene is still a romantic option here, with ‘sapiosexuality’ used to connote heteroromantic desires).

If you think they’re just two characters (that we have three seasons-worth of information on now), you may notice that girlfriends being ‘not really my area’ is the most Sherlock ever says about his sexuality for essentially three seasons, and so it gains near-equivalent weight to saying he’s not interested in women. Especially given Sherlock’s behavior with Irene and Janine, in the context of the rest of the show, this isn’t actually all that ambiguous. If you think about the show, you realize that Sherlock never denies being a couple with John (even in that exact scene, with Angelo), and this is a trend that continues indefinitely. You also realize that he is no longer married to his work as of Series 3 and ‘The Sign of Three’, where he actively preferred organizing John’s wedding to doing anything else, apparently. You may also hear a mirror of Sherlock saying ‘I know it’s fine’ with his conversation with Mycroft in ‘The Empty Hearse’— ‘why would anyone mind?’ Being ambiguously different is important to Sherlock, and he reiterates this in a scene where he tells Mycroft that being alone because of that is unnecessary, and he prefers not to be.

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skulls-and-tea:



The BBC drama controller [and original commissioner of Sherlock] Ben Stephenson, who is himself gay, said he was “really worried” that there are not many gay characters on television and called on writers to come forward with more stories addressing homosexuality.
Stephenson said it was simplistic to argue that greater diversity offscreen will result in improvement in on-screen portrayals, pointing to his own experience. “I am diverse, in that sense [gay], and are there many portrayals of gay characters on television?”
"I would say it’s probably one of the lowest [represented] areas.""When the great gay script comes in, I shall definitely be commissioning it."



As well as sexuality, he felt that more effort should be made to give mental illness — "a massive taboo on TV" — a better showing.
But this quest for diversity should not come at the cost of quality, he insisted.
"I want to commission great stuff — that’s all I care about," he declared at the ‘Changing the Face of TV’ panel discussion at New Broadcasting House.



Stephenson said that diversity in BBC drama was the best it has ever been, but stressed, “We’ve got a long way to go.”
He added: “The nature of my job is to help people who love drama find enough that connects with them over the course of the year, so they can say ‘that was worth the licence fee.’”
“The important thing is making these conversations feel creative and not about ticking a box, because no one believes that creates good drama.”



Ben Stephenson is the original commissioner of Sherlock, and has served as the BBC’s Controller of Drama Commissioning since 2008. 


Sources: Excerpts taken from overlapping reports on BBC’s ‘Reflect and Represent’ conference at the New Broadcasting House in February, 2014.
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[  Skulls &amp; Tea | Sherlock Creator Quotes Collection | Disclaimer/reblogs ]

skulls-and-tea:



The BBC drama controller [and original commissioner of SherlockBen Stephenson, who is himself gay, said he was “really worried” that there are not many gay characters on television and called on writers to come forward with more stories addressing homosexuality.

Stephenson said it was simplistic to argue that greater diversity offscreen will result in improvement in on-screen portrayals, pointing to his own experience. “I am diverse, in that sense [gay], and are there many portrayals of gay characters on television?”

"I would say it’s probably one of the lowest [represented] areas."

"When the great gay script comes in, I shall definitely be commissioning it."



As well as sexuality, he felt that more effort should be made to give mental illness — "a massive taboo on TV" — a better showing.

But this quest for diversity should not come at the cost of quality, he insisted.

"I want to commission great stuff — that’s all I care about," he declared at the ‘Changing the Face of TV’ panel discussion at New Broadcasting House.



Stephenson said that diversity in BBC drama was the best it has ever been, but stressed, “We’ve got a long way to go.”

He added: “The nature of my job is to help people who love drama find enough that connects with them over the course of the year, so they can say ‘that was worth the licence fee.’”

“The important thing is making these conversations feel creative and not about ticking a box, because no one believes that creates good drama.”



Ben Stephenson is the original commissioner of Sherlock, and has served as the BBC’s Controller of Drama Commissioning since 2008. 

Sources: Excerpts taken from overlapping reports on BBC’s ‘Reflect and Represent’ conference at the New Broadcasting House in February, 2014.

[x]     [x]     [x]     [x]     [x]

[ Skulls & Tea | Sherlock Creator Quotes Collection | Disclaimer/reblogs ]

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